Archive for the '18th century female artists' Category

Children as passports

As you leaf through women’s self-portraits of the past you can’t help seeing how many children are by our sides. They are everywhere – as babies, as toddlers, as siblings. It’s unsettling. Unsettling, because those children were our passports. They gave us permission to paint – not the children themselves (many of them probably wished their mothers weren’t so distracted by paint) but
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The original Supermum!

Have a look at this! Painted in 1789 by French artist Nicole-Marie Dumont, this painting has remained etched in my conscious since I first saw it. There is nothing terribly unusual about the painting itself, in fact it’s fairly predictable in its technicalities. It’s the subject matter that is so significant to me. The 18th century ‘supermum’! The artist presents herself
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Mary Cosway and her discontent

In 1787 a woman named Mary Cosway painted an amazing self-portrait. It was a portrait of her discontent. Today all that exists of the painting is an engraving by Valentine Green and as a result we must interpret her work partly through the hand of another. Even so, the message in Mary Cosway’s self-portrait is hard to miss. The composition
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Woman as painter: the 1700s and Elisabeth Vigee-Le Brun

With the 1700s we begin to see some really significant women artists coming to the fore. In her book The Obstacle Race, Germaine Greer uses an image on the cover by the artist Elisabeth Vigee-Le Brun, one time sensation of the European world. Here she is happily working away wearing a big red sash in front of a large canvas,
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